Commonwealth Games: Jake Wightman takes 1500m bronze as Australia’s Oliver Hoare wins gold

Hosts: Birmingham Dates: 28 July to 8 August
Coverage: Watch live on BBC TV with extra streams on BBC iPlayer, Red Button, BBC Sport website and BBC Sport mobile app; Listen on BBC Radio 5 Live and Sports Extra; live text and clips online.

Scotland’s world champion Jake Wightman had to settle for a Commonwealth bronze medal as Australia’s Oliver Hoare charged through in the final few metres to claim a sensational 1500m gold.

Wightman, who stunned the world championships in Eugene last month, made his move with 200m to go but could not hold the lead.

Hoare edged past Kenya’s Olympic silver medallist Timothy Cheruiyot at the line before sinking to his knees in disbelief at Alexander Stadium.

Meanwhile, England’s Nicky Miller defended his hammer title, having nearly failed to make it into the final three throws.

The 29-year-old faulted on his first two attempts, then threw 69.04m to make it into the top eight, before his fifth throw of 76.43 secured gold ahead of Ethan Katzberg of Canada, and Alexandros Poursanidis of Cyprus.

Hoare stuns quality field

Wightman was aiming to clinch the second leg of a golden hat-trick this summer, having won world gold and with the European Championships in Munich to come this month.

There was much anticipation at another sold-out session at Birmingham’s Alexander Stadium as Wightman led a stacked field of home nations athletes, plus formidable Kenyans Cheruiyot and Abel Kipsang.

But the story was Australia’s Hoare, who smashed his personal best by over two seconds to set a games record and correct his below par performance in the world championships, where he failed to even make the final.

The 25-year-old was fourth heading into the home straight, but powered through to deny Cheruiyot in the final few metres to become the first Australian man to win Commonwealth 1500m gold since Herb Elliot in 1958.

Scotland’s Olympic bronze medallist Josh Kerr was well off the pace and finished last.

Wales’ Jake Heyward was fifth, and England’s Matthew Stonier seventh ahead of Scotland’s Neil Gourlay, who finished eighth despite running a personal best.

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